Arizona Arrest Records and Warrant Search

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The Arizona Supreme Court has made information about court cases for most of the courts within the State of Arizona available online for public access. This information is available through the Arizona Judicial Branch’s website for public access to court information. Search options include searching by name or searching by case number. Information is updated each week and is available by electronic media for a fee. Keep in mind that the information is not certified and information should be verified with the court that reported the information before taking any actions based on the information found through the website.

What should I do if I find an open criminal case against me?

If you are searching Arizona’s online system for court cases and find a criminal case against you, contact an attorney immediately. An attorney will help you decide the best way to handle the matter and he will advise you about the current law that relates to the charge against you. Ignoring a criminal charge will only make matters worse. Consulting an attorney as soon as possible may mean you can find a way to resolve the criminal charges without serving time in jail.

How are arrest warrants issued in Arizona?

Upon sworn testimony or a sworn complaint setting forth the facts alleged, a magistrate may issue an arrest warrant if he or she believes probable cause exists. Probable cause is the belief that based upon the facts the suspect committed the crime that he is accused of committing. Probable cause does not determine guilt – – it only means that based upon the current facts as presented, a reasonable person would believe that the subject committed the crime alleged.

Is an arrest warrant required for a police officer to arrest someone?

No, a police officer may arrest a person without an arrest warrant if he witnesses a crime in progress. However, the officer must inform the suspect of the officer’s authority to arrest the person and inform him of the offense that the officer will be charging him with upon arrival before a judge. In fact, the arrest does not even need to be by an officer – – a private person can make an arrest in Arizona.

According to Title 13, Section 3889 of the Arizona Code of Laws, a private citizen may make an arrest. Just like a police officer arresting a person without a warrant, the citizen must inform the suspect that he is arresting him and why he is being arrested. As soon as possible, the private citizen shall deliver the person to a police officer or the nearest magistrate in the county where the arrest was made. Either the police officer of the private citizen must make a complaint before the magistrate setting forth the facts supporting the arrest.

Arizona’s resources for victims of crimes

Being the victim of a crime will change a person’s life forever. The emotional, physical and financial toll can be overwhelming for the victim and the victim’s family. The Arizona Department of Public Safety’s Crime Victim Services Unitoperates a website that provides valuable information about victim assistance programs in Arizona. Some programs deal with specific crimes while others deal with the financial burden a victim may suffer. Arizona’s Crime Victims’ Bill of Rightssets forth the rights of a crime victim. The website also gives excellent information about what to do if you believe that your rights as a crime victim have been violated.

Arizona crime data

From 1999 through 2008, crime rates in Arizona rose slightly – – by less than ten percent overall. Violent crimes made up approximately nine percent of the total crimes committed in Arizona during the ten years from 1999 through 2008. The total crimes committed during that period totaled a little over three million. Crime rates were steady during the 10 years and only fluctuated by twenty to forty thousand per year.

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